Projects Tag: NIST

On February 24, 2012, seven firefighters sustained injuries, including two serious injuries, when fire conditions rapidly changed, placing the crews in the flow path of the fire. The crews arrived at the residential fire and noticed flames extending from the…
On June 17, 2001, three firefighters lost their lives when an explosion occurred while fighting a fire in a mixed-use building. The building housed a hardware store on the first floor, storage for the store in the basement, and apartments…
In the span from 1975 to 2000, the increased use of home smoke alarms is credited as reducing home fire deaths by 50% in the United States. Part of the impetus for the greater prevalence of smoke alarms were the…
In 2011, a lieutenant and a firefighter with the San Francisco Fire Department lost their lives in a multi-level hillside residential structure fire while searching for the fire. The fire was on the floor below the firefighters. The National Institute…
Firefighting crew staffing size, alarm response size, and alarm response time are affected by many factors including funding and resource availability, and in turn effect the tactics and outcome at a fire. These companion projects from NIST used field experiments…
In 2012 in Illinois, a captain in the Chicago Fire Department sustained injuries at a 2-½ story apartment building fire and then succumbed to the injuries at a local hospital. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Fire…
Underwriter Laboratories (UL) Firefighter Safety Research Institute teamed with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to perform a series of full-scale fire behavior experiments with the Fire Department of New York. The goal of the experiments was to…
Thermally damaged self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) facepieces have been identified as a contributing factor in fire fighter fatalities or injuries. The SCBA facepiece lens is considered the weakest component of a fire fighter’s protective ensemble in high heat conditions, but…
The level of safety that a building affords occupants during a fire is based on regulatory codes or design. However, few of these regulations are based on a scientific understanding of how occupants will react during an emergency. For a…
Evacuation models are used to calculate the time required to evacuate a building. Due to a lack of data and theory on occupant behavior for use in evacuation models, evacuation models make assumption and simplifications about occupant behavior that inappropriately…
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