A Career Captain and a Part-Time Fire Fighter Die in a Residential Floor Collapse - Ohio

Report Date: July 2009

On April 04, 2004, a fire officer and a firefighter lost their lives when they were trapped during a floor collapse in a residential house fire. The crew arrived first to find a basement fire with moderate smoke showing. They attempted to advance a handline into the basement but had issues with water supply and hose length. As conditions worsened, the fire officer attempted to call a MAYDAY, but did not transmit. The second arriving crew noted the smoke becoming black, thick, and puffing and observed extreme heat using a thermal imaging camera, and therefore requested an evacuation of the building. In the deteriorating conditions, the initial crew ascended the stairs from the basement but then walked into the building above the seat of the fire instead of exiting. The two victims were later found by the rapid intervention team in the basement, trapped by a floor collapse near the seat of the fire. This NIOSH report details the events of the incident and provides recommendations based on the investigation. These investigations should be used to learn from tragedy in an effort to avoid similar losses in the future.

Applications
Organization

There are no known applications at this time.

Do you know of an instance that this report was applied to?

Powered by ChronoForms - ChronoEngine.com

  • The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

    Each year an average of 100 firefighters in the United States die in the line of duty. To address this continuing national occupational fatality problem, NIOSH conducts independent investigations of firefighter line of duty deaths. This web page provides access to NIOSH investigation reports and other fire fighter safety resources.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. A Career Captain and a Part-Time Fire Fighter Die in a Residential Floor Collapse - Ohio. Morgantown, WV: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, NIOSH Report #F2008-09, 2009. Print.

Rate this item
(0 votes)